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4 hands Siteswaps

Author: JiBe

This notation is used in certain specific cases:

Since J1 and J2 don't throw at the same time, one might think of it as nothing more than a single imaginary juggler with 4 hands throwing the clubs one after another in the following order:  RH-J1 (J1's right hand), RH-J2, LH-J1, LH-J2. 

Thus we can assign numbers to each throw as we did in normal siteswap and obtain the following table showing the correspondence between the two:

4-handed siteswap
Description
Normal siteswap equivalent
0
empty hand
0
1
impossible
0.5p
2
hand-across
1
3
impossible
1.5p
4
pause
2
5
almost impossible--very fast pass
2.5p
6
normal self
3
7
lofty single pass
3.5p
8
double self (straight across)
4
9
lofty double pass
4.5p
10
triple self (crossing)
5
11
lofty triple pass
5.5p

Remarks :


How to use it and examples

When faced with a 4-handed siteswap, first we have to know to whom the sequence applies--the 4-handed juggler, J1, J2?

Normally, there's a sequence for the virtual juggler: S1 S2 S 3 S4 S5 ...
and it is specified: where J1 does S1 S 3 S5 ... and J2 does S2 S4 ...

You can draw a table to associate each number with the hands of each juggler if you still need to convince yourself:

S1
S2
S 3
S4
S5
...
RH-J1
RH-J2
LH-J1
LH-J2
RH-J1
...

example 1 : 966 (3-count with 7 clubs)

The 4-handed siteswap is 9 6 6 9 6 6 9 6 6 ....
J1 does 966, J2 does 696 (just like 966).

The pattern is 966 in which J1 and J2 do 966 (lofty double pass, self, self).

example 2 : 96677 (asynchronous bookends)

The 4-handed siteswap is 9 6 6 7 7 9 6 6 7 7 ...
J1 does 96767, J2 does 67967 (identical to 96767).

The pattern is 96677 in which J1 and J2 do 96767 (lofty double pass, self, lofty single pass, self, lofty single pass).

example 3 : 9629669669969929 (Copenhagen countdown)

The 4-handed siteswap is 9 6 2 9 6 6 9 6 6 9 9 6 9 9 2 9
... J1 does 92696992, J2 does 69669699.

The pattern is 9629669669969929 in which J1 does 92696992 and J2 do 69669699. Don't feel obligated to try it, it's just to have an example where J1 and J2 don't do the same thing (this is because the length of the sequence is an even number).