Patterns

http://www.passingdb.com

Understanding the diagrams
Pulsar3 jugglers
The line3 jugglers
Hans Tornado3 jugglers
Beer passing3 jugglers
Turbo3 jugglers
3-count Bruno's nightmare3 jugglers
Bruno's nightmare3 jugglers
Hans Tornado (Inversed) 3 jugglers
Triangle 2 (3 jugglers)3 jugglers
Triangle 1 (3 jugglers)3 jugglers
Triangle3 jugglers
Tornado3 jugglers
Runarounds3 jugglers
The Y (aka oogle)4 jugglers
dynamic trapeze4 jugglers
4 jugglers line4 jugglers
The cross (aka the box)4 jugglers
Pistons4 jugglers
Rotating Y (aka oogle boogie)4 jugglers
Unicycle4 jugglers
Tarim's runaway4 jugglers
Speed-weave4 jugglers
Dresser drawer weave4 jugglers
Triangle 2 (4 jugglers)4 jugglers
Triangle 1 (4 jugglers)4 jugglers
Trapeze4 jugglers
Double rotation4 jugglers
Rotation4 jugglers
Benzene Ring for 4 jugglers4 jugglers
Karamazovs' feed4 jugglers
Shooting Star4 jugglers
PPS Cross-feed (Two on Two double 3-count)4 jugglers
Row Row Row Your Boat4 jugglers
Shifty Ferret4 jugglers
The Clock (Boston Circle)4, 5, 6, 7, n jugglers
Moveable Feast4, 5, 6, 7, n jugglers
Gandini's siteswaps weaves4,5, 6, 7, n jugglers
Karamazovs' rotating feed5 jugglers
Speed-weave with 2 feeders (Mr. Inside Mr. Outside Weave)5 jugglers
Double feed (aka Apollo)5 jugglers
Torture Chamber5 jugglers
Egg beater5 jugglers
Oogles & Klingons5, 6, 7 jugglers
Star5, 7 jugglers
Razor6 jugglers
Butterfly knot6 jugglers
Electrical Razor6 jugglers
Double unicycle6 jugglers
Magermix6 jugglers
Hourglass6 jugglers
Prism6 jugglers
Spinning Top6 jugglers
Inside-outside triangles6, 9 jugglers
It's possible6, n jugglers
Torture chamber for 7 jugglers7 jugglers
Interlaced speed-weave 8 jugglers
More people in Torture Chambersn jugglers

Understanding the diagrams

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For most passing patterns I present in this web site, the diagrams are normally sufficient to understand what happens. Here are the rules for reading them (with examples). And if there are still some unclear patterns, please let me know (if I made a mistake I'll correct it, otherwise I'll try to be clearer).

Generalities



A diagram represents at a given moment the positions (seen from above) of the jugglers (represented by letters), as well as the passes and the movements to do at this moment. On the diagram opposite (top), there are 4 jugglers ( A, B, E, and F).
The passes are represented by black arrows. Usually (top diagram), we can even see from which hand they are thrown and to which hand (here the passes are from "right hand" to "left hand"). If it is not the case (bottom diagram), further explanations will be given (but it's often a 2 or 4-count).
Very often, to be clearer, selfs throws are not represented (top diagram).Otherwise, they are represented by an arrow which comes back to the juggler (see D on the bottom diagram).
Only the beats on which there is at least a pass are represented. For example, for a 4-count passing, the diagrams show the beats 0, 4, 8, ...So sometimes it is better to see the other explanations precising the rhythm to understand everything.
The passes done above the shoulder may be drawn in the same way than the others (M to C on the bottom diagram). But they are mentioned in the explanations given with the diagrams.
It is generally conventional (apart from an explicite back-to-back passing) that a juggler is in front of the one who throws passes to him. In a few cases, orientation is represented by a black line. ( see the line).

Optional passes

It is possible to add passes for a passing, for example when 2 jugglers (almost face to face) are doing selfs in the same beat. These passes are represented in blue. The advantage is to see and understand easily simple variations (when it is not worth doing another diagram).On the opposite diagram, E and F can either do a pass or do their self with the right hand.

Moving ( dynamic passing)

The movements are represented by red arrows which show where the juggler has to move after the passes. They also show sometimes from where the juggler is coming.
The juggler has then to make a pass, then to move and keep juggling, in order to be where they have to be on the next diagram.
When movements are made above a well-known geometrical shape (see the circle opposite), these shapes appear on the diagrams.


Pulsar

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Credits: Created by Steve Otteson & Madison Area Jugglers, 1993

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

In this pattern, the jugglers take turns being feeder.

triangle_AB  triangle_AC  triangle_BC  triangle_AC  triangle_BC  triangle_AB
triangle_AC  triangle_AB  triangle_AC  triangle_BC  triangle_AB  triangle_BC

Let's adopt the following notation (relative to the feeder):
- Right: the juggler to the right of the feeder
- Left: the juggler to the feeder's left

So, in order:

After a feeder does Right-left, the next does Left-Right and vice-versa.  When feeding, each juggler might call out which he's doing (Right, Left) to make the pattern easier.


The line

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 intermediate, 2 good

This one is a classic.  B faces A and sends his passes back over his shoulder to C.  All the passes are singles (C has a long pass). 

B's passes should come in as close to the center as possible (like a tomahawk) after making two turns (in theory, it's a single, but in practice, do what you will).  There are also variants in which the club is thrown under the left arm, behind the back, or between the legs (trebla or albert, I don't remember which) instead of over the shoulder.

ligne

See also 4-person lines.

Rhythms:
Usually done in 4-count or 2-count, but 3-count (or other rhythms such as popcorn) is also interesting. Once solid with 9 clubs, try 10 in 2-count:

And if 10 works, try 11--the line may be the easiest way to do 11:

And if 11 works, try 12:


4-count versions with double-returns

Double returns can help handling the gap created by B's double pass (dropback).

With double-return in the middle

With double-return in the middle


A Trick

Here is a clean and flashy way for the middle person to make a half-pirouette, thus changing the direction of the line.  This works for a 9-club line in 4-count.

Looking at the diagram at the top, A, at any moment, can throw a triple to C (in a 2-count).  B immediately sends a crossing left-handed double to A and turns around just in time to receive C's pass.  The roles are switched.  The diagram below sums it up more clearly.


If this diagram makes no sense to you, read the explanation for causal diagrams.

As you can see, B has little time to react, so preferably, A should give a warning when he decides to throw the triple.

In a 4-count line, B can also turn while juggling (during the 3 selfs) without warning.  A and C then react accordingly


Hans Tornado

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Credits: Created by Hans Gault

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

This is in fact a tornado in which the feeder also spins, but in the reverse direction compared to the feedees. On the drawings below, the direction is different from the tornado. I had also done the drawings for a version where everydody spins in the other direction (which I think is easier, but opinions vary).

  
  


Beer passing

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

This beer passing is nothing more than a special runaround. What happens here is, we put down one club (or more) and replace it with a glass of beer (or anything else if you're not into beer or alcohol). The purpose is then to drink one (or more) gulp when you have the glass.

You need 4, 5 or 6 clubs (depending on how difficult you want it to be, and how drunk you already are) and a glass of beer (the yellow disc in the diagrams below). I give some detailed explanation for 6 clubs, but the process really is the same with fewer clubs.

A & B start with 3 clubs each on a 2-count. C has the glass in his right hand (and can start drinking).
With 5 clubs, B only has 2 clubs and thus doesn't make this first pass.
A & B are doing their LH self. C catches B's first pass, and keeps the glass in his RH.
B catches A's pass.  A doesn't catch anything, he now only has 2 clubs.
A & B pass. C can now give the glass to A (I did not say throw).

B & C are doing a LH self. To free his RH, C must now have given the glass to A. A & B pass. This is A's last pass. He can start to drink, but he also has to move to B's side.

B & C are doing a LH self. C now has 3 clubs (unless you started with less than 6).
A is now moving and drinking at the same time if he can manage that. This is also the moment where a fourth can come and replace the empty glass with a full one.

Back to the beginning, but the roles are different.

Turbo

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 advanced

Turbo is somewhat like Bruno's nightmare: constantly rotating the feeder's position.  But turbo uses fewer steps to change posts, making it significantly harder.  The juggler who moves (A in drawing 2) must begin turning right away to prepare for the next pass (drawing 4).

   
   

Rhythms :
2-count for the feeder and 4-count for the feedees (the problem is knowing when to start feeding and when to stop).


3-count Bruno's nightmare

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 advanced

The idea is similar to regular Bruno's nightmare, except now the feeder is in 3-count.  It's slower, and there is one less pass to make when changing places.

In the regular version, the change in positions takes three passes (from the mover's point of view; for the feeder it's 12):
- the first from the starting point (facing the current feeder)
- the second while crossing through the middle of the other two jugglers
- the third beside the feeder (which is also his last pass as feeder)

In the 3-count version, the last pass is omitted.  More specifically, after the pass is made from the middle (B in fig. 3), the moving juggler should continue moving to the other side while turning around (fig. 4), preparing to make his pass to the next feeder 6 counts later (fig. 5).

cauchemar_bruno1  cauchemar_bruno2  cauchemar_bruno3
cauchemar_bruno4  cauchemar_bruno5  cauchemar_bruno6

Rhythms:
Three-count (waltz) and 6-count (one person passing with the right hand, the other with the left).  To recap, the table below illustrates a full cycle (corresponding with the diagrams above).

1st rotation
2nd rotation
3rd rotation
4th rotation
A
6-count L
3-count
6-count R
6-count R
B
6-count R
6-count R
3-count
6-count L
C
3-count
6-count L
6-count L
3-count


Bruno's nightmare

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Credits: Bruno Saxern & Martin Frost

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

Bruno's Nightmare is in fact a rotating feed in which one juggler moves through the middle of the passing pattern.  In this pattern, one must imagine that each juggler represents one ball in a giant 3-ball cascade.

cauchemar_bruno1 cauchemar_bruno2 cauchemar_bruno3
cauchemar_bruno4 cauchemar_bruno5 cauchemar_bruno6

The above diagrams show B's movement, passing through the pattern to the other side.  The feeder's position then changes from C to A.  It's the feeder (C in this case) who counts (if there is a need to count) the 6 passes it takes to change positions.  As soon as C makes the sixth pass, it's his turn to begin moving to the other side, passing in 4-count (every other).  A is left as feeder, (switching to 2-count) and counts his first pass at the same time as C's sixth.

During B's movement, A should also move slightly (see figures 2, 3, and 4), otherwise B might get knocked in the head.  

Once you learn this, try Bruno's nightmare in 3-count or turbo with 3.

Rhythms:
4-count (every other) and 2-count (solids) as in a normal feed.


Hans Tornado (Inversed)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

  
  

version with normal spinning


Triangle 2 (3 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate

triangle21   triangle22   triangle23   triangle22

Rhythms:
A: 4-count
B: SPPP
C: 2-count

try also the 4-juggler version.


Triangle 1 (3 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate

One version in which there are 2 jugglers feeding (B & C):

triangle11  triangle12

Rhythms:
A: 4-count
B & C: 2-count

You can also put a fourth juggler in the middle: 4-juggler version.


Here it's similar, but you swap roles every 2 counts (change of feedee).

triangle11   triangle12   triangle11

triangle13   triangle11   triangle14

see also: 4-juggler version.


Triangle

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate

triangle This is the classical triangle pattern, the diagram showing a rhythm with passes made from the right hand. Using such a rhythm, you can do outside passes (as in the diagram) or inside passes (a pass from A's right hand to C's left), or you can alternate. But you also can (and should) use a lot of different rhythms or try the variations described on the pages triangle 1 and triangle 2.

Rhythms:
4-count or 2-count as described above.
The 3-count may be the best rhythm for this pattern and the most comfortable (for A : right hand passes to B, left hand passes to C).
But you can choose any rhythm (1-count, PPS, PPSPS...). Playing with PPS and alternating inside and outside passes is great fun.


Tornado

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

tournante tournante  tournante  tournante  tournante

What we want here is to have A and B turning around each other. The feeling for starting the pattern (diagram 1 for B and 5 for A) is similar to the one in Bruno's nightmare.
The feeder should try his best to anticipate the movements of the feedees.

Try also Hans' tornado, so that everybody gets to move.

Rhythms:
4-count for A&B, 2-count for C
Should be doable with C on a 3-count.


Runarounds

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

Runarounds are passing patterns where a juggler gets rid of all their clubs and takes up another position where they will start juggling again by receiving clubs from their partners.

Imagine yourself in the diagram to the left: A and B have 3 clubs each and C has none. A & B are passing together in 2-count until B decides to throw all his passes to C. Now, after 3 passes A no longer has clubs, so B & C are left passing. A can now move next to B and wait until C decides to pass with him (As in the beginning between C and B).
This is the basic maneuver for the following patterns.

It is possible to perform the maneuver described here without anyone stopping. To achieve this, we must not pass to the person from whom we received our clubs. B starts passing directly with C. After 3 passes C will be ready to throw to A, who no longer has any clubs, and who will have quickly moved next to B.

There are many ways to proceed with this maneuver, which may entail different positions to be taken by the jugglers when they move, or adding more clubs (or adding different rhythms but the descriptions here are given for a 2-count).

In the same spirit, the shooting star (4 jugglers) is a beautiful passing pattern, but much more dangerous...


Jugglers' Movement:

Three possibilities (that I am aware of) exist where the jugglers place themselves to the left or right of the juggler facing them when they move.

position diagram commentary

left

(pentagon)

    The juggler moves to place themselves to the left of the juggler facing them without crossing through the other two jugglers' pattern.

right

(line)

    The jugglers must go to the right of the juggler facing them. Therefore they must be ready to cross the pattern just after they throw their last pass. They must cross the pattern perpendicularly to the pattern. There is a risk of collision which can be avoided if the person who has just moved throws his last pass a little higher than necessary (C here).

right

(pentagon)

    The same thing as previously, but if jugglers don't move as far as previously, they can stay in a circle. All that needs to change is that the person next to the one who has moved, takes that person's place. As above, the same thing for applies for collisions.


Rhythms and numbers of clubs :

All the passing patterns that I describe are done in a 2-count. It is important to stay in time when one has less than 3 clubs, which means doing selfs (and not hand over a club) as if one has 3 clubs instead of 1 or 2.

Below is a table, which quickly summarizes some possible rhythms.

clubs description
6 The moving juggler has 2 beats (his hands are empty after his last pass) to take up his new position. Therefore there is a lot of time, and it is not necessary to run or anticipate the move.

7 singles

The pattern is basically the same as "6", except that the third juggler (C) starts with one club (instead of none). He are thus ready to throw his first club at the same time as the person who is about to move throws his last (A). There are two possibilities:

  • A (and the others will do the same when their turn comes) only throws 2 passes to B. He then arrives at his new position with the last club. He still has 2 beats to move, which gives him the opportunity for a flashy flourish, thumb-twirl etc... while he moves.
  • A throws his 3 clubs to B. Keeping in mind that he throws B his first club at the same time that he gets rid of his last, it is essential to anticipate the move. After his second throw, A should approach B and throw him his last pass while moving to catch the one thrown by C.
7 with doubles The feeling is exactly the same as with 6 clubs except that the base rhythm is a 7-club 2-count. We can therefore add an eighth club as we did when going from "6" to "7 singles".

The Y (aka oogle)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 3 intermediate

le y It is the geometric position of the jugglers (upside down here) that gives this pattern its name.  All passers pass at the same time on the same rhythm.  Beware of the (minor) risk of collisions between the passes from A-C and C-B.
Then try the moving version: rotating Y or variations on Y (Oogles & Klingon) with more jugglers (5, 6 or 7).

Rhythms:

With 12 clubs
4-count (every other) or 2-count (solids). For kicks, try other rhythms like waltz.

With 14 clubs
It's possible to try this with 14 clubs and a staggered start.  It works exactly like a 7-club 2-count pattern with 2 jugglers (here D and C) starting first, followed a beat later by A and B.  Everyone may do doubles, or just D and C (with A and B continuing in singles).

With 16 clubs
4 clubs per person.  Everyone starts at the same time and throws doubles.


dynamic trapeze

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

This pattern is a moving version of trapeze (have a look first if you don't have a clue as to what trapeze is).

trapeze_dynamique1  trapeze_dynamique2  trapeze_dynamique3  trapeze_dynamique4

It involves moving from the front to the back (or vice versa) every 4 beats (or every other pass if not passing in 2-count).  In this manner, jugglers always find themselfs back in the trapeze formation to make crossing passes, thus avoiding collisions.  Each movement is made immediately after each crossing pass in such a way as to be in position for the next crossing pass.

Rhythms:
Solids or other


4 jugglers line

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

These are just some possible positions for 4 jugglers standing in a line. Some of them may not be interesting on their own. However, they can be used as a transition between 2 others. You can try (using a few half-pirouettes for the jugglers in the middle) to go from each position to the others.

ligne
ligne
These 2 go together. The principle is the same as in the cross (go there to check out possible rhythms).
ligne What's there to say?
ligne A and D can do their passes in doubles, and can even use 7 clubs.

ligne

ligne

These are the "improved" versions of the classical line with 3 jugglers.

The cross (aka the box)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 beginners

La croix La croix

Rhythms:
Everything depends upon the rhythm in this one.  The four jugglers all pass with the same rhythm, but this can be done in several different ways, the only goal being to avoid collisions in the middle.

In the classic version, everyone does 4-count; while A&B pass, E&F (why not C&D?  Who knows?) throw right-handed selfs (fig. 1) and vice-versa. 

Second option: everyone doing 2-count; while A&B pass, E&F throw left-handed selfs.

Third option: Choose any rhythm (often two-count but this is a chance to put the left hand to work, so try waltz too).  Everyone passes at the same time and as if by some miracle, it can work.  The diagrams at right explain why and show the importance of being well synchronized.
Here, it suffices to observe two moments in the clubs' trajectory.  The positions of the clubs at each given moment are marked by black arrows, their trajectories by red lines.
croix synchro croix synchro

Fourth option:  When this works it's a huge deal, and one may well wonder why.  A&B and E&F do 7 clubs in doubles.  To avoid collisions, each must be sure that he makes each of his throws just after the juggler to his right. If A starts first, F follows half a beat later, then B, and then E.

Try also the cross in PPS.


Pistons

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

piston  piston

Two more diagrams would be needed to show a complete cycle, but it's fairly easy to understand what's happening.  A&D always move in the same direction in a square, movin from corner to corner after each pass.  B&C do the same in their own square.  Passes are made alternately to each of the two passers in the opposite square.  In a version that may be easier, passes may always be made to the same person if A&D rotate in the opposite direction.
The rhythm is usually a 4-count.

For a 6 jugglers version, try prism.


Rotating Y (aka oogle boogie)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

This pattern is taken directly from the static Y. Essentially, at each step, the jugglers find themselfs once again in the shape of a "Y."  Furthermore, as in the static version, each juggler always throws to the same person and receives from the same person (but those are two different people).

y_tournant1   y_tournant2   y_tournant3   y_tournant4

For this to work correctly, each juggler must be exactly in the right position each time while moving in an (imaginary) circle.  It's important to visualize where one should be passing (it's even advisable to anticipate the movements of the others) and where incoming passes will come in (2 different places).  In particular, in step 2 (valid problem in any step in fact), D may have a tendency to catch the pass intended for C.  

Rhythms:
4-count (every other) or 6-count at first if it's too fast. You can also move only on every 2 passes (or 3, or 4...).


Unicycle

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Credits: Created by Madison Area Jugglers, 1996

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 good, 2 advanced

monocycle1   monocycle2   monocycle3   monocycle4

A is the seat, B the fork, and C and D make the wheel with the circular path they follow.  Passes from B to A are made over the shoulder (backdrops). 
Along the same lines, see also the two-seated unicycle (6 jugglers).

Rhythms:
3-count (waltz)


Tarim's runaway

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Credits: Created by Tarim

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 advanced

This one is quite tricky (Tarim called it Runaway because when asked to try it out, people usually choose to run away). I would strongly advise you to first try the two static patterns on which this pattern is based:

Then you can have a go at the transitions.

Ultimate line feed:

    

Transition 1:

After a right hand pass, D catches the incoming pass and moves to the next position, ready for PPS with a RH start and starting outside, self, inside, inside...

   

PPS cross

     

Transition 2:

A moves after a RH pass to B. Before that, he has taken care to say "now" to C on their previous RH pass (so that C goes back to 3-count).
A goes to his new position with a RH pass to D 4 beats later. D, who has seen A moving, starts passing to him instead of doing selfs; he now is doing 1-count.

Ultimate line feed:

Back to the beginning, with different roles.

Speed-weave

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 intermediate, 3 good

In this pattern, there is one static feeder, and 3 moving feedees who are moving as if they were balls in a 3 ball cascade (a figure 8).

speed_wave1  speed_wave2  speed_wave3
speed_wave4  speed_wave5  speed_wave6

Some details:
The feedees are always moving. They can make a very short pause each time they're throwing (and receiving) a club, i.e. each time they're in the center or on the outside (where B & D are in diagram 1).
One always moves backward when on the outside after passing. When in the center, you move forward and to the side (and you'd better hurry because somebody is waiting to pass behind you).
The feeder passes Right-Center-Left-Center-Right-Center-Left... He should try to anticipate his fellow jugglers' movements (i.e. short on the center, and long on the outside).
With the classical version, the feedees are juggling a 6-count, which give them plenty of time to move (and to pick up should they need it).

Easy version with less passes:
In this slim version, the feeder only passes to the center. The feedees keep moving as in the classical version, but they only pass when in the center position. Erase the passes in diagrams 1, 3 and 5 and replace them with selfs.

Try also the dresser drawer weave (which might be easier).

Rhythms:
In the usual version, the feeder is doing a 2-count and the feedees are doing a 6-count.
In the easy version with passes only to and from the middle (see speed-weave), feeder in 4-count and feedees in 12-count.
In a hectic version, feeder in 1-count and feedees in 3-count.


Dresser drawer weave

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate, 1 good

The principle is similar to the classical speed-wave. We still have 3 feedees and a feeder, and they're doing pretty much the same thing. Pretty much, but not exactly, since in this pattern, the 3 feedees all have their own lines on which they're going to move. Not having to move on a small figure 8 shape makes it easier for them (but not for the feeder who has to vary the length of the passes).

speed_wave1  speed_wave2  speed_wave3
speed_wave4  speed_wave5  speed_wave6

Rhythms:
In the usual version, the feeder is doing a 2-count and the feedees are doing a 6-count.
In an easy version with passes only to and from the middle (see speed-weave), feeder in 4-count and feedees in 12-count.
In a hectic version, feeder in 1-count and feedees in 3-count.


Triangle 2 (4 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 3 intermediate

There is a 3-juggler version.

triangle24   triangle25   triangle26   triangle25

Rhythms:
A : 2-count
B : SS PS PS PS
C : 2-count
D : 4-count


Triangle 1 (4 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 3 intermediate

There is a 3-juggler version.

triangle15   triangle16

Rhythms:
A B and C: 2-count
D: 4-count


Another version with D turning around in order to face the others in turn.

triangle15   triangle16   triangle15 triangle17   triangle15   triangle18


Trapeze

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

trapeze1.gif  trapeze2.gif

The arrangement of trapeze solves the interesting question of how to have 4 people all feeding (normally in 2-count) while avoiding collisions when the clubs are supposed to cross.  Normally, if everyone's passes are dead on time, step 2 works without a hitch.  Otherwise, it may be necessary to play with the distances (such as increasing the distance between A and B).
If everything works well, try the moving version:  moving trapeze

Other interesting solutions include forming a square and putting two people (A&C or B&D) on chairs or to play with precision in timing in a true cross.

Rhythms:
2-count or 4-count


Double rotation

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

tourbillon  tourbillon  tourbillon  tourbillon  tourbillon

The diagrams do not show a complete cycle, but will suffice to show the concept behind the pattern.  Concentrating only on juggler A, we can say the following:
A passes to the juggler across from him (C), changes places with the juggler next to him (B), makes another pass to C, then turns 90 degrees to change partners and begin the cycle again.  
When studying with the movements, it becomes clear that if A goes behind once (red arrow, figure 1), he will pass through in front the next time (red arrow, figure 3).

Rhythms:
4-count (every other). It's also possible to do a 6-count while changing positions.


Rotation

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

rotation1   rotation2   rotation3   rotation4
 
The passes in blue are optional.  If you decide to do them, you may choose either to make a normal pass (trying to avoid hitting the person between you and your partner, as well as a nearly inevitable collision) or to make all passes in doubles (not crossing), which adds a nice visual effect (and simplifies the pattern) even if certain purists don't like the resulting dead time.  

Rhythms:
4-count in both cases (it can be done in 6-count to simplify things in the version without the blue passes).  Jugglers gone mad may try other, faster rhythms. 


Benzene Ring for 4 jugglers

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Credits: Created in July 1997 by Madison Area Juggers

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 intermediate, 2 good

   

The diagrams should be enough. It's just a little bit fast for A & B when done in a 3-count.
The benzene ring is in fact a double unicycle without the seats.

Rhythms:
3-count (waltz): A & B have only 2 selfs for moving or turning (but the diagrams show a 4-count).
Try a slower rhythm (4-count or 5-count) if the 3-count proves too hard.


Karamazovs' feed

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

karamazov1 This is actually a rotating feed with 4 jugglers.  The post (D here, at the beginning) juggles in solids (2-count).  The jugglers on the ends (A and C at the start) are in 8 count (yes, it's slow) and the one in the middle (B) does every-others (4-count).  Thus they begin with a feed where D feeds in the order:  A, B, C, B, A, B...
A is the one who will move first.
karamazov2 When D passes with B (just after D's pass with C--see the top diagram), A prepares to make his last pass.
karamazov3 A makes the aforementioned last pass.
karamazov4 As soon as he has received D's pass, A moves quickly across, next to D, while the latter, upon seeing A move, makes his last pass with B (who then goes into 8-count).
karamazov5 At this time, A replaces D as post and passes with C (who should have already adjusted to the change and will then go into 4-count) and D moves quickly across next to C for the next pass.
karamazov6 A now passes with D, and the configuration is once again like the first step.  While all this is happening, B, not having much to do, has time to do a few tricks.

If you want more Karamazov patterns, try the Karamazov rotating feed (5 jugglers)


Shooting Star

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

This passing pattern is based on the star (the passes and positions are the same) from which a juggler has been removed. Then you have an empty space and C should not throw to that 'hole'.  Thus C will start with no clubs (see variations at the bottom); all the others get 3 clubs.
Meanwhile, B does not receive any passes from the others, so when 3 passes have been made, he won't have any clubs left. At that moment, C will have 3 clubs, and will be about to throw a club in the hole. B now has to go through the pattern and be ready to catch C's pass.
Once B's there, you start again from the beginning, but B now has C's role and D has B's. That's the principle.  Now there are a few different ways to cross the pattern (running and hoping you won't get hit by a club is one of them). Here is another one that works on a 2-count.

In fact, B only does 2 passes in diagram 1. Before making his third pass, B steps in the middle of the pattern so that A's pass will travel just behind his neck (diagram 2). He now has to turn to be ready to catch C's first pass (diagram 3) while D's pass to A flies behind his back. By moving backward, he reaches his new position and can breathe again (diagram 4). D can now start to worry about himself.

etoile_trou1 etoile_trou2 etoile_trou3 etoile_trou4

See also the other runarounds.

Rhythms and number of clubs:
The above version uses a 2-count and 9 clubs.
But you can also play with the rhythm (between 2 and 4-count) and on the number of clubs (you can add 1 or 2 clubs--though I don't know exactly how--with the 4-count). The more clubs, the faster it gets.


PPS Cross-feed (Two on Two double 3-count)

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Credits: July 1997, Madison Area Jugglers

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 advanced

This isn't a true cross like the one I described on another page, but it's very similar, and after all, all you have to do is add a few passes.

Each juggler is in fact doing a PPS feed with the two people facing him.  While A&C do PPS, B&D do PSP.

     


Row Row Row Your Boat

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Credits: Julian Orbach, July 1997.

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

Technically, this is a fairly straight forward pattern. However, it has an interesting twist.

Four jugglers stand in a square facing in, and sing. The pattern is in the form of a canon or round - there are four verses, and each person starts with a different verse, so everyone gets to sing every part, at a different time to each other.

The song is the traditional Row, Row, Row Your Boat.

If you don't know the tune, try this site or you can download this small mp3 (32 Kb).

To start, one juggler starts at Verse 1 and every other juggler should be singing the verse immediately AFTER the juggler on their RIGHT.

The passing pattern is:

Beat:

12345678

Hand:

RLRLRLRL
Verse 1
Sing:Row, row, rowyourboat 
Pass:across self self across 
Verse 2
Sing:Gent-lydownthestream **. 
Pass:self left left self 
Verse 3
Sing:Merri-ly,merri-ly,merri-ly,merri-ly,
Pass:across right right across 
Verse 4
Sing:Lifeisbutadream ** 
Pass:self self self self 

** It is easy to forget the extra beats in Verse 2 and Verse 4 as there is nothing to sing here.

The pattern could be done without singing, but it is actually easier to keep count by singing along and associating the passes with certain words. Failing to sing is not in keeping with the pattern, and is frowned upon in polite juggling circles.

Variation: 1-count (i.e. Verse 3 is ultimate instead of 2-count)


Shifty Ferret

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Credits: Created by Who?What?Why?Where? in Perth

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

Shifty Ferret builds on the sweep feed and the box in order to create a dynamic pattern. It's not a difficult pattern if you can remember what to do and when.

The diagrams under do not show all beats, but only the different jugglers positions in a chronological order. Let's take the first 2 diagrams to see what happens in details, and I'll leave the rest for you to work out.
- in the first one, A&C pass first, then B&D pass and start moving to position 2.
- A&C pass again (between position 1 and 2).
- A, after his passes to C, becomes feeder in a 2-count and feed D, C & B once.
- A comes back to a 4-count after a last pass to C (between position 2 and 3).

Jugglers alternate in fact between 2-count, 4-count and 8-count. But it's easier to try watch what's happening and pass accordingly than to remember the whole counting cycle.


The Clock (Boston Circle)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 5 intermediate

This pattern has also be called "Turning Circle" or "Feast".

For the clock, the successive passes of a same juggler are made to different persons.
As many jugglers as you want can participate (with a minimum of 3), they are arranged in a circle. Each juggler passes in turn to all the other jugglers, including themselfs.
The juggler A will begin with a pass for C ( diagram 1), the next pass will be for B ( diagram 2), but after that, the pass is for himself, he will do a self ( diagram 3) then will continue with a pass for F ( diagram 4), and so on.

horloge1   horloge1   horloge3   horloge4

If there is an odd number of jugglers, one of them will begin with a self ( the pass for himself).

Aidan had suggested in the comment to try the moveable feast as a nice variation. This pattern now has its own page: the moveable feast.

Rhythms:
Any passing rhythm.


Moveable Feast

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

The moveable feast is a variation on the clock, where every juggler passes to all the others in turn, including themselves. The jugglers start in 2 lines facing each other and pass to the person opposite them. So, no matter how many people join in, there are no awkward long passes.





These diagrams for 10 jugglers should give you a good idea of the pattern, even if they don't show a full cycle. Here are a few more tips:
The usual rhythm is a 4-count for everybody
After each pass, everyone moves 1 step to the left, so their next pass will be with a new partner (the person next to their last partner). In the diagrams, J7 passes with J4, then J3, then J2, ...
After passing at the left end of each line (J5 and J10 in diagram 1), a juggler has 7 beats to change side, 3 selfs, a pass to himself(!) and 3 more selfs. Some people might prefer to gather their clubs and start again on the other side.
Adding 2 jugglers to the pattern is fairly simple. One joins each line.

If you have an odd number of jugglers, then there will always be somebody changing line. See the diagrams under for 9 jugglers.

 


Gandini's siteswaps weaves

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

The principle is to use a feeder that will represent the brain of a giant juggler. The balls are represented by other jugglers (the feedees) who go back and forth between 2 positions (the cross on the diagrams) where they pass with the feeder; these positions are the giant juggler's hands. We're also going to use a bit of siteswap theory.

The feeder passes alternately to both positions (and usually in a 2-count). A feedee will be either in one of the hands, or queuing behind if there is already someone there. When a feedee is in the hand, the feeder (at the same time as the pass is made) will give him a number (corresponding to a siteswap throw). The feedee will then move according to this number (let's call it n) and we have:
- (number of right hand selfs before the next pass) = n-1
- if n is even, the feedee will queue again for the same position (hand)
- if n is odd, the feedee will change hands.

Here are a few diagrams to show you what a feedee should do when the feeder says 1, 2 or 3.

  

On a general level, the feeder will choose a working siteswap sequence, and the feedees in front of him will arrange themselves to start correctly (compare with how many balls in each hand you need for the true pattern), and there you go!
The feeder can choose to change the siteswap sequence at any moment since he's saying the numbers out loud.
Below is an example for 534 (4 feedees since it's a 4 object pattern):

   


Karamazovs' rotating feed

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Jugglers needed (base version): 5 good

This rotating feed is an invention of the "Flying Karamazov Brothers" who presented it on stage during their show.  Each juggler in turn will become post in a line feed, and in fact only makes one sweep through the line, after which the last feedee becomes the feeder.  To allow the formation to turn, the jugglers should form a circle rather than a true line.  You may, of course, try this with a smaller or greater number of jugglers. 

     

In the diagrams, A is the post at the beginning.  He feeds the other 4 in order, and the feeder changes with A's pass with E (at the end of the line).  Everyone then repositions themselfs (cf. diagrams 4 and 5) and E continues as post.  The next feeder will be D, etc.... 

Along the same lines, there is also the Karamazov rotating feed.

Rhythms:
the classical version is 2-count for the post and 4-count for the others, now it's up to you to use your imagination.


Speed-weave with 2 feeders (Mr. Inside Mr. Outside Weave)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 2 intermediate, 3 good

You just take the speed-weave, but you give the feeder position to 2 people--A & E who are then doing a 4-count. E makes the outside passes, while A passes to the juggler in the middle position. You can also try it with E standing on A's shoulders.

  
  


Double feed (aka Apollo)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 1 intermediate, 3 good

   

The easiest rhythm (shown in the diagrams) is:
-A in 2-count
-B, C, D & E in 4-count.

To make some jugglers' left hands participate, this can also be done with:
-A in 1-count (ultimate)
-C in left-handed 2-count
-B, D, & E in right-handed 2-count

Finally, you might try adding a club (on a rhythm with A in 2-count).  Thus A starts with 4 clubs.  E, B, & D start one count later, and C starts one beat after A's second pass (which is coming to him).  For E, it feels the same as before.


Torture Chamber

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Credits: Created by Carsten & Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 intermediate, 2 good, 1 advanced

Well, the figures below combined with some comments should do it.  When it's all said and done, it's much easier to explain than to do.

torture51   torture52   torture53   torture54

Given that C and D are in every others (4-count), these should normally be the easiest positions, but they must be able to catch M's potentially hazardous passes.  That's all for C and D.  The others are all passing in solids (2-count).  M faces A and B. 

Positions A and B are a little harder.  A should wait for a pass from C when throwing to B (steps 1 and 2).  This makes a 90 angle. Also, they are doing solids (2-count), making a feed without a carriage return (cf. line feeds).

Finally we have M (as in Masochist).  That's where it's best to have a good passer.  Since M faces A and B, the passes to C and D are made blindly.  Either the two passes are made over the shoulder (backdrops), or M can turn slightly and throw under his arm to C and over the shoulder to D.

If you want to add more people, see how with torture chamber for 7.


Egg beater

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Credits: Created by Mike Newton & Madison Area Jugglers, blue variation invented by Martin Frost

Jugglers needed (base version): 5 good

batteur1   batteur2   batteur3   batteur4
batteur5   batteur6   batteur7   batteur8

Rhythms:
2-count for A, SSPSPSSP for the others without the blue passes.
2-count for A, PSPPPSPS for the others with the blue passes.


Oogles & Klingons

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Credits: First publication on the web by Chan Wilson

Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 2 intermediate, 2 good

Here are a few variations on the Y (aka Oogle) in which 1, 2 or 3 jugglers can be added to the pattern.


Double Oogle

Klingon (Oogle with wings)

Klingon with shield

Double oogle
You add a juggler and D passes dropback to him.
klingon

klingon
klingon_armure klingon_armure
(Klingon with full shield if you add the blue passes)

Star

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Jugglers needed (base version): 2 beginners, 3 intermediate

etoile

The diagram (here passing with the right hand with the same rhythm) simply lays out what a star looks like.   The concept becomes interesting starting with 5 jugglers, but it's possible to add more (the distance of the passes increases with the number), as long as there is an odd number of jugglers.

Always keep in mind that the timing of the passes is important, otherwise there's a risk of collisions between B's passes and A's (or C's) for example.

There's a dangerous version with 4 people:  shooting star.

Rhythms:
Um, all of them (I think; in the end it depends on whether you can avoid collisions)


Razor

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Credits: Created by Peter Kaseman & Madison Area Jugglers

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 good, 4 advanced

monocycle1   monocycle2
monocycle3   monocycle4

Rhythms:
3-count (very hard), 4-count or 6-count


Butterfly knot

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

  
  

Rhythms :
4-count


Electrical Razor

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Credits: Created by Peter Kaseman, summer 98

Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

monocycle1   monocycle2
monocycle3   monocycle4

Rhythms:
3-count (very hard), otherwise 4 or 6-count


Double unicycle

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Credits: Created by Madison Area Jugglers

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good, 2 advanced

double_monocycle1   double_monocycle2   double_monocycle3   double_monocycle4

First have a go to the basic version: the unicycle (4 jugglers). The benzene ring for 4 can also help you build up to the pattern, since it's a double unicycle without the seats.

Rhythms:
3-count (waltz)


Magermix

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

I've never tried this pattern, since I'm even not sure how it goes. Please contact me if you know. On the right is a representation of Bruno's nightmare (diagrams being slightly different than usual). And below is what I think would be magermix.   
Bruno's nightmare

 

           

 


Hourglass

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Credits: Created by Carsten & Co at IJA 1991 (St Louis), first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate, 2 good

hourglass1  hourglass2  hourglass3  hourglass4

Prism

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Credits: Created by Aidan, March 2003

Jugglers needed (base version): 6 intermediate

This is a variation of pistons for 6 jugglers.

A variation:

Aidan also came up with a variation where 2 jugglers swap sides in the pattern every 3 passes.

Imagine the jugglers have done the first 2 passes (see the first 2 diagrams above). Now replace the third diagram above by the first one on the left. The passes are the same, but the movement that follows is going to be different :
- C, F and D are not going to move
- A, B, and E are going to swap position in the middle triangle, and A&E also have to turn 180° while moving.
When this is done, A & E have swapped sides, and the normal pattern resumes for 3 more passes.

In this pattern, B never swaps side.


Spinning Top

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 intermediate

A turns in order to feed all the others alternatively.
The 5 others alternate their passes between their 2 neighboors, except of course when they're passing to A (the next pass is then made to the right neighboor).
You can try in with a 4-count or 3-count.


Inside-outside triangles

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Credits: first published by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

triangle_inscrit1 If the basic pattern is a 4 counts, it is possible to pass separately in the 2 triangles ( inside and outside) on the beat of the self.
To enlarge this concept, it is also possible theoretically to add as many triangles as we want, as shown on the diagram on the right.
triangle_inscrit2

 


It's possible

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Credits: A Rolla Rob Creation, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 beginners, 2 intermediate, 2 good

possible1   possible2   possible3   possible4

B and C can move slightly between each pass as shown in the diagrams, in order to ease E & F's task.


You can also add 3 jugglers to the pattern, which will make it easier for the first 6 (3 more since if you add somebody in the middle, then you need 2 more on the outside circle).

possible_bonus1   possible_bonus2   possible_bonus1   possible_bonus3

On the outside circle, you then have 2 triangles (ACE and BDF) that are doing a 4-count with a gap between them. If you take each triangle individually, it's not possible (due to the amount of stuff and jugglers in the middle) for the jugglers in one triangle to add passes among themselves instead of their selfs (A-C, C-E, E-A for example). But some early or late doubles could work.


Torture chamber for 7 jugglers

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Credits: Created by Carsten & Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 beginners, 2 intermediate, 2 good, 1 advanced

Take the torture chamber for 5 and add 2 jugglers to make it 7. These extra 2 jugglers are going to do a simple 4-count: E will pass with C and F will pass with D. These passes, E-C and F-D will happen instead of C and D RH selfs in the 5-juggler version.

torture71 torture72  torture73 torture74

If E and F get bored (since they're only doing a 4-count), they can add another club to the pattern, and replace their RH selfs with some triple passes to each other.  Then it's as if they're juggling a 7-club 4-count in triples, but making passes to C and D instead of their RH selfs (in red in the above diagram).

7 club 4-count in triples (about causal diagrams)

You can put more people in torture chambers.


Interlaced speed-weave

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Jugglers needed (base version): 8 advanced

That's what it is, 2 speed-weaves, one inside the other. A, B & C are facing D and are doing a classical speed-weave. E, F, & G are facing H and are doing a speed-weave but rotating in the opposite direction (going backward when at the center position). I've not tried it yet, and to my knowledge, no one has.

If this is possible, I think you'll have to juggle slowly in order to make room for everybody on the figure 8.

   


More people in Torture Chambers

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Jugglers needed (base version): 8 good, 2 advanced

The principle is to connect several torture chambers. Two ways of doing that are explained here. If you don't know what is exactly a torture chamber, check the relevant page.

torture9 The first technique is to use one of the jugglers in a 4 counts ( C or D but here the pivot is [D_red=C_blue] who is actually only one person) as a link between two chambers in which he is participating simultaneously.
This principle can then be continued until one circle is closed ( 3 chambers may be enough with 12 very good jugglers).
torture10 The other technic is to align two chambers alongside each other. The passes are the same at every moment in the two chambers.
The two jugglers D_red and D_blue are not then in 4 counts anymore, but in 2 counts, making passes between them instead of selfs.
With this technique, you can align as many chambers as the number of jugglers allows since C can also be used as a link.

Patterns

http://www.passingdb.com

Understanding the diagrams
Pulsar3 jugglers
The line3 jugglers
Hans Tornado3 jugglers
Beer passing3 jugglers
Turbo3 jugglers
3-count Bruno's nightmare3 jugglers
Bruno's nightmare3 jugglers
Hans Tornado (Inversed) 3 jugglers
Triangle 2 (3 jugglers)3 jugglers
Triangle 1 (3 jugglers)3 jugglers
Triangle3 jugglers
Tornado3 jugglers
Runarounds3 jugglers
The Y (aka oogle)4 jugglers
dynamic trapeze4 jugglers
4 jugglers line4 jugglers
The cross (aka the box)4 jugglers
Pistons4 jugglers
Rotating Y (aka oogle boogie)4 jugglers
Unicycle4 jugglers
Tarim's runaway4 jugglers
Speed-weave4 jugglers
Dresser drawer weave4 jugglers
Triangle 2 (4 jugglers)4 jugglers
Triangle 1 (4 jugglers)4 jugglers
Trapeze4 jugglers
Double rotation4 jugglers
Rotation4 jugglers
Benzene Ring for 4 jugglers4 jugglers
Karamazovs' feed4 jugglers
Shooting Star4 jugglers
PPS Cross-feed (Two on Two double 3-count)4 jugglers
Row Row Row Your Boat4 jugglers
Shifty Ferret4 jugglers
The Clock (Boston Circle)4, 5, 6, 7, n jugglers
Moveable Feast4, 5, 6, 7, n jugglers
Gandini's siteswaps weaves4,5, 6, 7, n jugglers
Karamazovs' rotating feed5 jugglers
Speed-weave with 2 feeders (Mr. Inside Mr. Outside Weave)5 jugglers
Double feed (aka Apollo)5 jugglers
Torture Chamber5 jugglers
Egg beater5 jugglers
Oogles & Klingons5, 6, 7 jugglers
Star5, 7 jugglers
Razor6 jugglers
Butterfly knot6 jugglers
Electrical Razor6 jugglers
Double unicycle6 jugglers
Magermix6 jugglers
Hourglass6 jugglers
Prism6 jugglers
Spinning Top6 jugglers
Inside-outside triangles6, 9 jugglers
It's possible6, n jugglers
Torture chamber for 7 jugglers7 jugglers
Interlaced speed-weave 8 jugglers
More people in Torture Chambersn jugglers

Understanding the diagrams

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For most passing patterns I present in this web site, the diagrams are normally sufficient to understand what happens. Here are the rules for reading them (with examples). And if there are still some unclear patterns, please let me know (if I made a mistake I'll correct it, otherwise I'll try to be clearer).

Generalities



A diagram represents at a given moment the positions (seen from above) of the jugglers (represented by letters), as well as the passes and the movements to do at this moment. On the diagram opposite (top), there are 4 jugglers ( A, B, E, and F).
The passes are represented by black arrows. Usually (top diagram), we can even see from which hand they are thrown and to which hand (here the passes are from "right hand" to "left hand"). If it is not the case (bottom diagram), further explanations will be given (but it's often a 2 or 4-count).
Very often, to be clearer, selfs throws are not represented (top diagram).Otherwise, they are represented by an arrow which comes back to the juggler (see D on the bottom diagram).
Only the beats on which there is at least a pass are represented. For example, for a 4-count passing, the diagrams show the beats 0, 4, 8, ...So sometimes it is better to see the other explanations precising the rhythm to understand everything.
The passes done above the shoulder may be drawn in the same way than the others (M to C on the bottom diagram). But they are mentioned in the explanations given with the diagrams.
It is generally conventional (apart from an explicite back-to-back passing) that a juggler is in front of the one who throws passes to him. In a few cases, orientation is represented by a black line. ( see the line).

Optional passes

It is possible to add passes for a passing, for example when 2 jugglers (almost face to face) are doing selfs in the same beat. These passes are represented in blue. The advantage is to see and understand easily simple variations (when it is not worth doing another diagram).On the opposite diagram, E and F can either do a pass or do their self with the right hand.

Moving ( dynamic passing)

The movements are represented by red arrows which show where the juggler has to move after the passes. They also show sometimes from where the juggler is coming.
The juggler has then to make a pass, then to move and keep juggling, in order to be where they have to be on the next diagram.
When movements are made above a well-known geometrical shape (see the circle opposite), these shapes appear on the diagrams.


Pulsar

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Credits: Created by Steve Otteson & Madison Area Jugglers, 1993

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

In this pattern, the jugglers take turns being feeder.

triangle_AB  triangle_AC  triangle_BC  triangle_AC  triangle_BC  triangle_AB
triangle_AC  triangle_AB  triangle_AC  triangle_BC  triangle_AB  triangle_BC

Let's adopt the following notation (relative to the feeder):
- Right: the juggler to the right of the feeder
- Left: the juggler to the feeder's left

So, in order:

After a feeder does Right-left, the next does Left-Right and vice-versa.  When feeding, each juggler might call out which he's doing (Right, Left) to make the pattern easier.


The line

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 intermediate, 2 good

This one is a classic.  B faces A and sends his passes back over his shoulder to C.  All the passes are singles (C has a long pass). 

B's passes should come in as close to the center as possible (like a tomahawk) after making two turns (in theory, it's a single, but in practice, do what you will).  There are also variants in which the club is thrown under the left arm, behind the back, or between the legs (trebla or albert, I don't remember which) instead of over the shoulder.

ligne

See also 4-person lines.

Rhythms:
Usually done in 4-count or 2-count, but 3-count (or other rhythms such as popcorn) is also interesting. Once solid with 9 clubs, try 10 in 2-count:

And if 10 works, try 11--the line may be the easiest way to do 11:

And if 11 works, try 12:


4-count versions with double-returns

Double returns can help handling the gap created by B's double pass (dropback).

With double-return in the middle

With double-return in the middle


A Trick

Here is a clean and flashy way for the middle person to make a half-pirouette, thus changing the direction of the line.  This works for a 9-club line in 4-count.

Looking at the diagram at the top, A, at any moment, can throw a triple to C (in a 2-count).  B immediately sends a crossing left-handed double to A and turns around just in time to receive C's pass.  The roles are switched.  The diagram below sums it up more clearly.


If this diagram makes no sense to you, read the explanation for causal diagrams.

As you can see, B has little time to react, so preferably, A should give a warning when he decides to throw the triple.

In a 4-count line, B can also turn while juggling (during the 3 selfs) without warning.  A and C then react accordingly


Hans Tornado

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Credits: Created by Hans Gault

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

This is in fact a tornado in which the feeder also spins, but in the reverse direction compared to the feedees. On the drawings below, the direction is different from the tornado. I had also done the drawings for a version where everydody spins in the other direction (which I think is easier, but opinions vary).

  
  


Beer passing

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

This beer passing is nothing more than a special runaround. What happens here is, we put down one club (or more) and replace it with a glass of beer (or anything else if you're not into beer or alcohol). The purpose is then to drink one (or more) gulp when you have the glass.

You need 4, 5 or 6 clubs (depending on how difficult you want it to be, and how drunk you already are) and a glass of beer (the yellow disc in the diagrams below). I give some detailed explanation for 6 clubs, but the process really is the same with fewer clubs.

A & B start with 3 clubs each on a 2-count. C has the glass in his right hand (and can start drinking).
With 5 clubs, B only has 2 clubs and thus doesn't make this first pass.
A & B are doing their LH self. C catches B's first pass, and keeps the glass in his RH.
B catches A's pass.  A doesn't catch anything, he now only has 2 clubs.
A & B pass. C can now give the glass to A (I did not say throw).

B & C are doing a LH self. To free his RH, C must now have given the glass to A. A & B pass. This is A's last pass. He can start to drink, but he also has to move to B's side.

B & C are doing a LH self. C now has 3 clubs (unless you started with less than 6).
A is now moving and drinking at the same time if he can manage that. This is also the moment where a fourth can come and replace the empty glass with a full one.

Back to the beginning, but the roles are different.

Turbo

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 advanced

Turbo is somewhat like Bruno's nightmare: constantly rotating the feeder's position.  But turbo uses fewer steps to change posts, making it significantly harder.  The juggler who moves (A in drawing 2) must begin turning right away to prepare for the next pass (drawing 4).

   
   

Rhythms :
2-count for the feeder and 4-count for the feedees (the problem is knowing when to start feeding and when to stop).


3-count Bruno's nightmare

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 advanced

The idea is similar to regular Bruno's nightmare, except now the feeder is in 3-count.  It's slower, and there is one less pass to make when changing places.

In the regular version, the change in positions takes three passes (from the mover's point of view; for the feeder it's 12):
- the first from the starting point (facing the current feeder)
- the second while crossing through the middle of the other two jugglers
- the third beside the feeder (which is also his last pass as feeder)

In the 3-count version, the last pass is omitted.  More specifically, after the pass is made from the middle (B in fig. 3), the moving juggler should continue moving to the other side while turning around (fig. 4), preparing to make his pass to the next feeder 6 counts later (fig. 5).

cauchemar_bruno1  cauchemar_bruno2  cauchemar_bruno3
cauchemar_bruno4  cauchemar_bruno5  cauchemar_bruno6

Rhythms:
Three-count (waltz) and 6-count (one person passing with the right hand, the other with the left).  To recap, the table below illustrates a full cycle (corresponding with the diagrams above).

1st rotation
2nd rotation
3rd rotation
4th rotation
A
6-count L
3-count
6-count R
6-count R
B
6-count R
6-count R
3-count
6-count L
C
3-count
6-count L
6-count L
3-count


Bruno's nightmare

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Credits: Bruno Saxern & Martin Frost

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

Bruno's Nightmare is in fact a rotating feed in which one juggler moves through the middle of the passing pattern.  In this pattern, one must imagine that each juggler represents one ball in a giant 3-ball cascade.

cauchemar_bruno1 cauchemar_bruno2 cauchemar_bruno3
cauchemar_bruno4 cauchemar_bruno5 cauchemar_bruno6

The above diagrams show B's movement, passing through the pattern to the other side.  The feeder's position then changes from C to A.  It's the feeder (C in this case) who counts (if there is a need to count) the 6 passes it takes to change positions.  As soon as C makes the sixth pass, it's his turn to begin moving to the other side, passing in 4-count (every other).  A is left as feeder, (switching to 2-count) and counts his first pass at the same time as C's sixth.

During B's movement, A should also move slightly (see figures 2, 3, and 4), otherwise B might get knocked in the head.  

Once you learn this, try Bruno's nightmare in 3-count or turbo with 3.

Rhythms:
4-count (every other) and 2-count (solids) as in a normal feed.


Hans Tornado (Inversed)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

  
  

version with normal spinning


Triangle 2 (3 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate

triangle21   triangle22   triangle23   triangle22

Rhythms:
A: 4-count
B: SPPP
C: 2-count

try also the 4-juggler version.


Triangle 1 (3 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate

One version in which there are 2 jugglers feeding (B & C):

triangle11  triangle12

Rhythms:
A: 4-count
B & C: 2-count

You can also put a fourth juggler in the middle: 4-juggler version.


Here it's similar, but you swap roles every 2 counts (change of feedee).

triangle11   triangle12   triangle11

triangle13   triangle11   triangle14

see also: 4-juggler version.


Triangle

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate

triangle This is the classical triangle pattern, the diagram showing a rhythm with passes made from the right hand. Using such a rhythm, you can do outside passes (as in the diagram) or inside passes (a pass from A's right hand to C's left), or you can alternate. But you also can (and should) use a lot of different rhythms or try the variations described on the pages triangle 1 and triangle 2.

Rhythms:
4-count or 2-count as described above.
The 3-count may be the best rhythm for this pattern and the most comfortable (for A : right hand passes to B, left hand passes to C).
But you can choose any rhythm (1-count, PPS, PPSPS...). Playing with PPS and alternating inside and outside passes is great fun.


Tornado

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

tournante tournante  tournante  tournante  tournante

What we want here is to have A and B turning around each other. The feeling for starting the pattern (diagram 1 for B and 5 for A) is similar to the one in Bruno's nightmare.
The feeder should try his best to anticipate the movements of the feedees.

Try also Hans' tornado, so that everybody gets to move.

Rhythms:
4-count for A&B, 2-count for C
Should be doable with C on a 3-count.


Runarounds

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 good

Runarounds are passing patterns where a juggler gets rid of all their clubs and takes up another position where they will start juggling again by receiving clubs from their partners.

Imagine yourself in the diagram to the left: A and B have 3 clubs each and C has none. A & B are passing together in 2-count until B decides to throw all his passes to C. Now, after 3 passes A no longer has clubs, so B & C are left passing. A can now move next to B and wait until C decides to pass with him (As in the beginning between C and B).
This is the basic maneuver for the following patterns.

It is possible to perform the maneuver described here without anyone stopping. To achieve this, we must not pass to the person from whom we received our clubs. B starts passing directly with C. After 3 passes C will be ready to throw to A, who no longer has any clubs, and who will have quickly moved next to B.

There are many ways to proceed with this maneuver, which may entail different positions to be taken by the jugglers when they move, or adding more clubs (or adding different rhythms but the descriptions here are given for a 2-count).

In the same spirit, the shooting star (4 jugglers) is a beautiful passing pattern, but much more dangerous...


Jugglers' Movement:

Three possibilities (that I am aware of) exist where the jugglers place themselves to the left or right of the juggler facing them when they move.

position diagram commentary

left

(pentagon)

    The juggler moves to place themselves to the left of the juggler facing them without crossing through the other two jugglers' pattern.

right

(line)

    The jugglers must go to the right of the juggler facing them. Therefore they must be ready to cross the pattern just after they throw their last pass. They must cross the pattern perpendicularly to the pattern. There is a risk of collision which can be avoided if the person who has just moved throws his last pass a little higher than necessary (C here).

right

(pentagon)

    The same thing as previously, but if jugglers don't move as far as previously, they can stay in a circle. All that needs to change is that the person next to the one who has moved, takes that person's place. As above, the same thing for applies for collisions.


Rhythms and numbers of clubs :

All the passing patterns that I describe are done in a 2-count. It is important to stay in time when one has less than 3 clubs, which means doing selfs (and not hand over a club) as if one has 3 clubs instead of 1 or 2.

Below is a table, which quickly summarizes some possible rhythms.

clubs description
6 The moving juggler has 2 beats (his hands are empty after his last pass) to take up his new position. Therefore there is a lot of time, and it is not necessary to run or anticipate the move.

7 singles

The pattern is basically the same as "6", except that the third juggler (C) starts with one club (instead of none). He are thus ready to throw his first club at the same time as the person who is about to move throws his last (A). There are two possibilities:

  • A (and the others will do the same when their turn comes) only throws 2 passes to B. He then arrives at his new position with the last club. He still has 2 beats to move, which gives him the opportunity for a flashy flourish, thumb-twirl etc... while he moves.
  • A throws his 3 clubs to B. Keeping in mind that he throws B his first club at the same time that he gets rid of his last, it is essential to anticipate the move. After his second throw, A should approach B and throw him his last pass while moving to catch the one thrown by C.
7 with doubles The feeling is exactly the same as with 6 clubs except that the base rhythm is a 7-club 2-count. We can therefore add an eighth club as we did when going from "6" to "7 singles".

The Y (aka oogle)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 3 intermediate

le y It is the geometric position of the jugglers (upside down here) that gives this pattern its name.  All passers pass at the same time on the same rhythm.  Beware of the (minor) risk of collisions between the passes from A-C and C-B.
Then try the moving version: rotating Y or variations on Y (Oogles & Klingon) with more jugglers (5, 6 or 7).

Rhythms:

With 12 clubs
4-count (every other) or 2-count (solids). For kicks, try other rhythms like waltz.

With 14 clubs
It's possible to try this with 14 clubs and a staggered start.  It works exactly like a 7-club 2-count pattern with 2 jugglers (here D and C) starting first, followed a beat later by A and B.  Everyone may do doubles, or just D and C (with A and B continuing in singles).

With 16 clubs
4 clubs per person.  Everyone starts at the same time and throws doubles.


dynamic trapeze

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

This pattern is a moving version of trapeze (have a look first if you don't have a clue as to what trapeze is).

trapeze_dynamique1  trapeze_dynamique2  trapeze_dynamique3  trapeze_dynamique4

It involves moving from the front to the back (or vice versa) every 4 beats (or every other pass if not passing in 2-count).  In this manner, jugglers always find themselfs back in the trapeze formation to make crossing passes, thus avoiding collisions.  Each movement is made immediately after each crossing pass in such a way as to be in position for the next crossing pass.

Rhythms:
Solids or other


4 jugglers line

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

These are just some possible positions for 4 jugglers standing in a line. Some of them may not be interesting on their own. However, they can be used as a transition between 2 others. You can try (using a few half-pirouettes for the jugglers in the middle) to go from each position to the others.

ligne
ligne
These 2 go together. The principle is the same as in the cross (go there to check out possible rhythms).
ligne What's there to say?
ligne A and D can do their passes in doubles, and can even use 7 clubs.

ligne

ligne

These are the "improved" versions of the classical line with 3 jugglers.

The cross (aka the box)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 beginners

La croix La croix

Rhythms:
Everything depends upon the rhythm in this one.  The four jugglers all pass with the same rhythm, but this can be done in several different ways, the only goal being to avoid collisions in the middle.

In the classic version, everyone does 4-count; while A&B pass, E&F (why not C&D?  Who knows?) throw right-handed selfs (fig. 1) and vice-versa. 

Second option: everyone doing 2-count; while A&B pass, E&F throw left-handed selfs.

Third option: Choose any rhythm (often two-count but this is a chance to put the left hand to work, so try waltz too).  Everyone passes at the same time and as if by some miracle, it can work.  The diagrams at right explain why and show the importance of being well synchronized.
Here, it suffices to observe two moments in the clubs' trajectory.  The positions of the clubs at each given moment are marked by black arrows, their trajectories by red lines.
croix synchro croix synchro

Fourth option:  When this works it's a huge deal, and one may well wonder why.  A&B and E&F do 7 clubs in doubles.  To avoid collisions, each must be sure that he makes each of his throws just after the juggler to his right. If A starts first, F follows half a beat later, then B, and then E.

Try also the cross in PPS.


Pistons

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

piston  piston

Two more diagrams would be needed to show a complete cycle, but it's fairly easy to understand what's happening.  A&D always move in the same direction in a square, movin from corner to corner after each pass.  B&C do the same in their own square.  Passes are made alternately to each of the two passers in the opposite square.  In a version that may be easier, passes may always be made to the same person if A&D rotate in the opposite direction.
The rhythm is usually a 4-count.

For a 6 jugglers version, try prism.


Rotating Y (aka oogle boogie)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

This pattern is taken directly from the static Y. Essentially, at each step, the jugglers find themselfs once again in the shape of a "Y."  Furthermore, as in the static version, each juggler always throws to the same person and receives from the same person (but those are two different people).

y_tournant1   y_tournant2   y_tournant3   y_tournant4

For this to work correctly, each juggler must be exactly in the right position each time while moving in an (imaginary) circle.  It's important to visualize where one should be passing (it's even advisable to anticipate the movements of the others) and where incoming passes will come in (2 different places).  In particular, in step 2 (valid problem in any step in fact), D may have a tendency to catch the pass intended for C.  

Rhythms:
4-count (every other) or 6-count at first if it's too fast. You can also move only on every 2 passes (or 3, or 4...).


Unicycle

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Credits: Created by Madison Area Jugglers, 1996

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 good, 2 advanced

monocycle1   monocycle2   monocycle3   monocycle4

A is the seat, B the fork, and C and D make the wheel with the circular path they follow.  Passes from B to A are made over the shoulder (backdrops). 
Along the same lines, see also the two-seated unicycle (6 jugglers).

Rhythms:
3-count (waltz)


Tarim's runaway

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Credits: Created by Tarim

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 advanced

This one is quite tricky (Tarim called it Runaway because when asked to try it out, people usually choose to run away). I would strongly advise you to first try the two static patterns on which this pattern is based:

Then you can have a go at the transitions.

Ultimate line feed:

    

Transition 1:

After a right hand pass, D catches the incoming pass and moves to the next position, ready for PPS with a RH start and starting outside, self, inside, inside...

   

PPS cross

     

Transition 2:

A moves after a RH pass to B. Before that, he has taken care to say "now" to C on their previous RH pass (so that C goes back to 3-count).
A goes to his new position with a RH pass to D 4 beats later. D, who has seen A moving, starts passing to him instead of doing selfs; he now is doing 1-count.

Ultimate line feed:

Back to the beginning, with different roles.

Speed-weave

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 intermediate, 3 good

In this pattern, there is one static feeder, and 3 moving feedees who are moving as if they were balls in a 3 ball cascade (a figure 8).

speed_wave1  speed_wave2  speed_wave3
speed_wave4  speed_wave5  speed_wave6

Some details:
The feedees are always moving. They can make a very short pause each time they're throwing (and receiving) a club, i.e. each time they're in the center or on the outside (where B & D are in diagram 1).
One always moves backward when on the outside after passing. When in the center, you move forward and to the side (and you'd better hurry because somebody is waiting to pass behind you).
The feeder passes Right-Center-Left-Center-Right-Center-Left... He should try to anticipate his fellow jugglers' movements (i.e. short on the center, and long on the outside).
With the classical version, the feedees are juggling a 6-count, which give them plenty of time to move (and to pick up should they need it).

Easy version with less passes:
In this slim version, the feeder only passes to the center. The feedees keep moving as in the classical version, but they only pass when in the center position. Erase the passes in diagrams 1, 3 and 5 and replace them with selfs.

Try also the dresser drawer weave (which might be easier).

Rhythms:
In the usual version, the feeder is doing a 2-count and the feedees are doing a 6-count.
In the easy version with passes only to and from the middle (see speed-weave), feeder in 4-count and feedees in 12-count.
In a hectic version, feeder in 1-count and feedees in 3-count.


Dresser drawer weave

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Jugglers needed (base version): 3 intermediate, 1 good

The principle is similar to the classical speed-wave. We still have 3 feedees and a feeder, and they're doing pretty much the same thing. Pretty much, but not exactly, since in this pattern, the 3 feedees all have their own lines on which they're going to move. Not having to move on a small figure 8 shape makes it easier for them (but not for the feeder who has to vary the length of the passes).

speed_wave1  speed_wave2  speed_wave3
speed_wave4  speed_wave5  speed_wave6

Rhythms:
In the usual version, the feeder is doing a 2-count and the feedees are doing a 6-count.
In an easy version with passes only to and from the middle (see speed-weave), feeder in 4-count and feedees in 12-count.
In a hectic version, feeder in 1-count and feedees in 3-count.


Triangle 2 (4 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 3 intermediate

There is a 3-juggler version.

triangle24   triangle25   triangle26   triangle25

Rhythms:
A : 2-count
B : SS PS PS PS
C : 2-count
D : 4-count


Triangle 1 (4 jugglers)

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Credits: Created by Ed Carsten and/or Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 3 intermediate

There is a 3-juggler version.

triangle15   triangle16

Rhythms:
A B and C: 2-count
D: 4-count


Another version with D turning around in order to face the others in turn.

triangle15   triangle16   triangle15 triangle17   triangle15   triangle18


Trapeze

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

trapeze1.gif  trapeze2.gif

The arrangement of trapeze solves the interesting question of how to have 4 people all feeding (normally in 2-count) while avoiding collisions when the clubs are supposed to cross.  Normally, if everyone's passes are dead on time, step 2 works without a hitch.  Otherwise, it may be necessary to play with the distances (such as increasing the distance between A and B).
If everything works well, try the moving version:  moving trapeze

Other interesting solutions include forming a square and putting two people (A&C or B&D) on chairs or to play with precision in timing in a true cross.

Rhythms:
2-count or 4-count


Double rotation

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

tourbillon  tourbillon  tourbillon  tourbillon  tourbillon

The diagrams do not show a complete cycle, but will suffice to show the concept behind the pattern.  Concentrating only on juggler A, we can say the following:
A passes to the juggler across from him (C), changes places with the juggler next to him (B), makes another pass to C, then turns 90 degrees to change partners and begin the cycle again.  
When studying with the movements, it becomes clear that if A goes behind once (red arrow, figure 1), he will pass through in front the next time (red arrow, figure 3).

Rhythms:
4-count (every other). It's also possible to do a 6-count while changing positions.


Rotation

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

rotation1   rotation2   rotation3   rotation4
 
The passes in blue are optional.  If you decide to do them, you may choose either to make a normal pass (trying to avoid hitting the person between you and your partner, as well as a nearly inevitable collision) or to make all passes in doubles (not crossing), which adds a nice visual effect (and simplifies the pattern) even if certain purists don't like the resulting dead time.  

Rhythms:
4-count in both cases (it can be done in 6-count to simplify things in the version without the blue passes).  Jugglers gone mad may try other, faster rhythms. 


Benzene Ring for 4 jugglers

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Credits: Created in July 1997 by Madison Area Juggers

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 intermediate, 2 good

   

The diagrams should be enough. It's just a little bit fast for A & B when done in a 3-count.
The benzene ring is in fact a double unicycle without the seats.

Rhythms:
3-count (waltz): A & B have only 2 selfs for moving or turning (but the diagrams show a 4-count).
Try a slower rhythm (4-count or 5-count) if the 3-count proves too hard.


Karamazovs' feed

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

karamazov1 This is actually a rotating feed with 4 jugglers.  The post (D here, at the beginning) juggles in solids (2-count).  The jugglers on the ends (A and C at the start) are in 8 count (yes, it's slow) and the one in the middle (B) does every-others (4-count).  Thus they begin with a feed where D feeds in the order:  A, B, C, B, A, B...
A is the one who will move first.
karamazov2 When D passes with B (just after D's pass with C--see the top diagram), A prepares to make his last pass.
karamazov3 A makes the aforementioned last pass.
karamazov4 As soon as he has received D's pass, A moves quickly across, next to D, while the latter, upon seeing A move, makes his last pass with B (who then goes into 8-count).
karamazov5 At this time, A replaces D as post and passes with C (who should have already adjusted to the change and will then go into 4-count) and D moves quickly across next to C for the next pass.
karamazov6 A now passes with D, and the configuration is once again like the first step.  While all this is happening, B, not having much to do, has time to do a few tricks.

If you want more Karamazov patterns, try the Karamazov rotating feed (5 jugglers)


Shooting Star

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

This passing pattern is based on the star (the passes and positions are the same) from which a juggler has been removed. Then you have an empty space and C should not throw to that 'hole'.  Thus C will start with no clubs (see variations at the bottom); all the others get 3 clubs.
Meanwhile, B does not receive any passes from the others, so when 3 passes have been made, he won't have any clubs left. At that moment, C will have 3 clubs, and will be about to throw a club in the hole. B now has to go through the pattern and be ready to catch C's pass.
Once B's there, you start again from the beginning, but B now has C's role and D has B's. That's the principle.  Now there are a few different ways to cross the pattern (running and hoping you won't get hit by a club is one of them). Here is another one that works on a 2-count.

In fact, B only does 2 passes in diagram 1. Before making his third pass, B steps in the middle of the pattern so that A's pass will travel just behind his neck (diagram 2). He now has to turn to be ready to catch C's first pass (diagram 3) while D's pass to A flies behind his back. By moving backward, he reaches his new position and can breathe again (diagram 4). D can now start to worry about himself.

etoile_trou1 etoile_trou2 etoile_trou3 etoile_trou4

See also the other runarounds.

Rhythms and number of clubs:
The above version uses a 2-count and 9 clubs.
But you can also play with the rhythm (between 2 and 4-count) and on the number of clubs (you can add 1 or 2 clubs--though I don't know exactly how--with the 4-count). The more clubs, the faster it gets.


PPS Cross-feed (Two on Two double 3-count)

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Credits: July 1997, Madison Area Jugglers

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 advanced

This isn't a true cross like the one I described on another page, but it's very similar, and after all, all you have to do is add a few passes.

Each juggler is in fact doing a PPS feed with the two people facing him.  While A&C do PPS, B&D do PSP.

     


Row Row Row Your Boat

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Credits: Julian Orbach, July 1997.

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

Technically, this is a fairly straight forward pattern. However, it has an interesting twist.

Four jugglers stand in a square facing in, and sing. The pattern is in the form of a canon or round - there are four verses, and each person starts with a different verse, so everyone gets to sing every part, at a different time to each other.

The song is the traditional Row, Row, Row Your Boat.

If you don't know the tune, try this site or you can download this small mp3 (32 Kb).

To start, one juggler starts at Verse 1 and every other juggler should be singing the verse immediately AFTER the juggler on their RIGHT.

The passing pattern is:

Beat:

12345678

Hand:

RLRLRLRL
Verse 1
Sing:Row, row, rowyourboat 
Pass:across self self across 
Verse 2
Sing:Gent-lydownthestream **. 
Pass:self left left self 
Verse 3
Sing:Merri-ly,merri-ly,merri-ly,merri-ly,
Pass:across right right across 
Verse 4
Sing:Lifeisbutadream ** 
Pass:self self self self 

** It is easy to forget the extra beats in Verse 2 and Verse 4 as there is nothing to sing here.

The pattern could be done without singing, but it is actually easier to keep count by singing along and associating the passes with certain words. Failing to sing is not in keeping with the pattern, and is frowned upon in polite juggling circles.

Variation: 1-count (i.e. Verse 3 is ultimate instead of 2-count)


Shifty Ferret

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Credits: Created by Who?What?Why?Where? in Perth

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate

Shifty Ferret builds on the sweep feed and the box in order to create a dynamic pattern. It's not a difficult pattern if you can remember what to do and when.

The diagrams under do not show all beats, but only the different jugglers positions in a chronological order. Let's take the first 2 diagrams to see what happens in details, and I'll leave the rest for you to work out.
- in the first one, A&C pass first, then B&D pass and start moving to position 2.
- A&C pass again (between position 1 and 2).
- A, after his passes to C, becomes feeder in a 2-count and feed D, C & B once.
- A comes back to a 4-count after a last pass to C (between position 2 and 3).

Jugglers alternate in fact between 2-count, 4-count and 8-count. But it's easier to try watch what's happening and pass accordingly than to remember the whole counting cycle.


The Clock (Boston Circle)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 5 intermediate

This pattern has also be called "Turning Circle" or "Feast".

For the clock, the successive passes of a same juggler are made to different persons.
As many jugglers as you want can participate (with a minimum of 3), they are arranged in a circle. Each juggler passes in turn to all the other jugglers, including themselfs.
The juggler A will begin with a pass for C ( diagram 1), the next pass will be for B ( diagram 2), but after that, the pass is for himself, he will do a self ( diagram 3) then will continue with a pass for F ( diagram 4), and so on.

horloge1   horloge1   horloge3   horloge4

If there is an odd number of jugglers, one of them will begin with a self ( the pass for himself).

Aidan had suggested in the comment to try the moveable feast as a nice variation. This pattern now has its own page: the moveable feast.

Rhythms:
Any passing rhythm.


Moveable Feast

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

The moveable feast is a variation on the clock, where every juggler passes to all the others in turn, including themselves. The jugglers start in 2 lines facing each other and pass to the person opposite them. So, no matter how many people join in, there are no awkward long passes.





These diagrams for 10 jugglers should give you a good idea of the pattern, even if they don't show a full cycle. Here are a few more tips:
The usual rhythm is a 4-count for everybody
After each pass, everyone moves 1 step to the left, so their next pass will be with a new partner (the person next to their last partner). In the diagrams, J7 passes with J4, then J3, then J2, ...
After passing at the left end of each line (J5 and J10 in diagram 1), a juggler has 7 beats to change side, 3 selfs, a pass to himself(!) and 3 more selfs. Some people might prefer to gather their clubs and start again on the other side.
Adding 2 jugglers to the pattern is fairly simple. One joins each line.

If you have an odd number of jugglers, then there will always be somebody changing line. See the diagrams under for 9 jugglers.

 


Gandini's siteswaps weaves

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Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good

The principle is to use a feeder that will represent the brain of a giant juggler. The balls are represented by other jugglers (the feedees) who go back and forth between 2 positions (the cross on the diagrams) where they pass with the feeder; these positions are the giant juggler's hands. We're also going to use a bit of siteswap theory.

The feeder passes alternately to both positions (and usually in a 2-count). A feedee will be either in one of the hands, or queuing behind if there is already someone there. When a feedee is in the hand, the feeder (at the same time as the pass is made) will give him a number (corresponding to a siteswap throw). The feedee will then move according to this number (let's call it n) and we have:
- (number of right hand selfs before the next pass) = n-1
- if n is even, the feedee will queue again for the same position (hand)
- if n is odd, the feedee will change hands.

Here are a few diagrams to show you what a feedee should do when the feeder says 1, 2 or 3.

  

On a general level, the feeder will choose a working siteswap sequence, and the feedees in front of him will arrange themselves to start correctly (compare with how many balls in each hand you need for the true pattern), and there you go!
The feeder can choose to change the siteswap sequence at any moment since he's saying the numbers out loud.
Below is an example for 534 (4 feedees since it's a 4 object pattern):

   


Karamazovs' rotating feed

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Jugglers needed (base version): 5 good

This rotating feed is an invention of the "Flying Karamazov Brothers" who presented it on stage during their show.  Each juggler in turn will become post in a line feed, and in fact only makes one sweep through the line, after which the last feedee becomes the feeder.  To allow the formation to turn, the jugglers should form a circle rather than a true line.  You may, of course, try this with a smaller or greater number of jugglers. 

     

In the diagrams, A is the post at the beginning.  He feeds the other 4 in order, and the feeder changes with A's pass with E (at the end of the line).  Everyone then repositions themselfs (cf. diagrams 4 and 5) and E continues as post.  The next feeder will be D, etc.... 

Along the same lines, there is also the Karamazov rotating feed.

Rhythms:
the classical version is 2-count for the post and 4-count for the others, now it's up to you to use your imagination.


Speed-weave with 2 feeders (Mr. Inside Mr. Outside Weave)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 2 intermediate, 3 good

You just take the speed-weave, but you give the feeder position to 2 people--A & E who are then doing a 4-count. E makes the outside passes, while A passes to the juggler in the middle position. You can also try it with E standing on A's shoulders.

  
  


Double feed (aka Apollo)

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Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 1 intermediate, 3 good

   

The easiest rhythm (shown in the diagrams) is:
-A in 2-count
-B, C, D & E in 4-count.

To make some jugglers' left hands participate, this can also be done with:
-A in 1-count (ultimate)
-C in left-handed 2-count
-B, D, & E in right-handed 2-count

Finally, you might try adding a club (on a rhythm with A in 2-count).  Thus A starts with 4 clubs.  E, B, & D start one count later, and C starts one beat after A's second pass (which is coming to him).  For E, it feels the same as before.


Torture Chamber

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Credits: Created by Carsten & Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 intermediate, 2 good, 1 advanced

Well, the figures below combined with some comments should do it.  When it's all said and done, it's much easier to explain than to do.

torture51   torture52   torture53   torture54

Given that C and D are in every others (4-count), these should normally be the easiest positions, but they must be able to catch M's potentially hazardous passes.  That's all for C and D.  The others are all passing in solids (2-count).  M faces A and B. 

Positions A and B are a little harder.  A should wait for a pass from C when throwing to B (steps 1 and 2).  This makes a 90 angle. Also, they are doing solids (2-count), making a feed without a carriage return (cf. line feeds).

Finally we have M (as in Masochist).  That's where it's best to have a good passer.  Since M faces A and B, the passes to C and D are made blindly.  Either the two passes are made over the shoulder (backdrops), or M can turn slightly and throw under his arm to C and over the shoulder to D.

If you want to add more people, see how with torture chamber for 7.


Egg beater

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Credits: Created by Mike Newton & Madison Area Jugglers, blue variation invented by Martin Frost

Jugglers needed (base version): 5 good

batteur1   batteur2   batteur3   batteur4
batteur5   batteur6   batteur7   batteur8

Rhythms:
2-count for A, SSPSPSSP for the others without the blue passes.
2-count for A, PSPPPSPS for the others with the blue passes.


Oogles & Klingons

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Credits: First publication on the web by Chan Wilson

Jugglers needed (base version): 1 beginner, 2 intermediate, 2 good

Here are a few variations on the Y (aka Oogle) in which 1, 2 or 3 jugglers can be added to the pattern.


Double Oogle

Klingon (Oogle with wings)

Klingon with shield

Double oogle
You add a juggler and D passes dropback to him.
klingon

klingon
klingon_armure klingon_armure
(Klingon with full shield if you add the blue passes)

Star

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Jugglers needed (base version): 2 beginners, 3 intermediate

etoile

The diagram (here passing with the right hand with the same rhythm) simply lays out what a star looks like.   The concept becomes interesting starting with 5 jugglers, but it's possible to add more (the distance of the passes increases with the number), as long as there is an odd number of jugglers.

Always keep in mind that the timing of the passes is important, otherwise there's a risk of collisions between B's passes and A's (or C's) for example.

There's a dangerous version with 4 people:  shooting star.

Rhythms:
Um, all of them (I think; in the end it depends on whether you can avoid collisions)


Razor

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Credits: Created by Peter Kaseman & Madison Area Jugglers

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 good, 4 advanced

monocycle1   monocycle2
monocycle3   monocycle4

Rhythms:
3-count (very hard), 4-count or 6-count


Butterfly knot

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

  
  

Rhythms :
4-count


Electrical Razor

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Credits: Created by Peter Kaseman, summer 98

Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

monocycle1   monocycle2
monocycle3   monocycle4

Rhythms:
3-count (very hard), otherwise 4 or 6-count


Double unicycle

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Credits: Created by Madison Area Jugglers

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 good, 2 advanced

double_monocycle1   double_monocycle2   double_monocycle3   double_monocycle4

First have a go to the basic version: the unicycle (4 jugglers). The benzene ring for 4 can also help you build up to the pattern, since it's a double unicycle without the seats.

Rhythms:
3-count (waltz)


Magermix

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

I've never tried this pattern, since I'm even not sure how it goes. Please contact me if you know. On the right is a representation of Bruno's nightmare (diagrams being slightly different than usual). And below is what I think would be magermix.   
Bruno's nightmare

 

           

 


Hourglass

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Credits: Created by Carsten & Co at IJA 1991 (St Louis), first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 4 intermediate, 2 good

hourglass1  hourglass2  hourglass3  hourglass4

Prism

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Credits: Created by Aidan, March 2003

Jugglers needed (base version): 6 intermediate

This is a variation of pistons for 6 jugglers.

A variation:

Aidan also came up with a variation where 2 jugglers swap sides in the pattern every 3 passes.

Imagine the jugglers have done the first 2 passes (see the first 2 diagrams above). Now replace the third diagram above by the first one on the left. The passes are the same, but the movement that follows is going to be different :
- C, F and D are not going to move
- A, B, and E are going to swap position in the middle triangle, and A&E also have to turn 180° while moving.
When this is done, A & E have swapped sides, and the normal pattern resumes for 3 more passes.

In this pattern, B never swaps side.


Spinning Top

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Jugglers needed (base version): 6 intermediate

A turns in order to feed all the others alternatively.
The 5 others alternate their passes between their 2 neighboors, except of course when they're passing to A (the next pass is then made to the right neighboor).
You can try in with a 4-count or 3-count.


Inside-outside triangles

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Credits: first published by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 6 good

triangle_inscrit1 If the basic pattern is a 4 counts, it is possible to pass separately in the 2 triangles ( inside and outside) on the beat of the self.
To enlarge this concept, it is also possible theoretically to add as many triangles as we want, as shown on the diagram on the right.
triangle_inscrit2

 


It's possible

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Credits: A Rolla Rob Creation, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 beginners, 2 intermediate, 2 good

possible1   possible2   possible3   possible4

B and C can move slightly between each pass as shown in the diagrams, in order to ease E & F's task.


You can also add 3 jugglers to the pattern, which will make it easier for the first 6 (3 more since if you add somebody in the middle, then you need 2 more on the outside circle).

possible_bonus1   possible_bonus2   possible_bonus1   possible_bonus3

On the outside circle, you then have 2 triangles (ACE and BDF) that are doing a 4-count with a gap between them. If you take each triangle individually, it's not possible (due to the amount of stuff and jugglers in the middle) for the jugglers in one triangle to add passes among themselves instead of their selfs (A-C, C-E, E-A for example). But some early or late doubles could work.


Torture chamber for 7 jugglers

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Credits: Created by Carsten & Co, first publication by Ed Carsten

Jugglers needed (base version): 2 beginners, 2 intermediate, 2 good, 1 advanced

Take the torture chamber for 5 and add 2 jugglers to make it 7. These extra 2 jugglers are going to do a simple 4-count: E will pass with C and F will pass with D. These passes, E-C and F-D will happen instead of C and D RH selfs in the 5-juggler version.

torture71 torture72  torture73 torture74

If E and F get bored (since they're only doing a 4-count), they can add another club to the pattern, and replace their RH selfs with some triple passes to each other.  Then it's as if they're juggling a 7-club 4-count in triples, but making passes to C and D instead of their RH selfs (in red in the above diagram).

7 club 4-count in triples (about causal diagrams)

You can put more people in torture chambers.


Interlaced speed-weave

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Jugglers needed (base version): 8 advanced

That's what it is, 2 speed-weaves, one inside the other. A, B & C are facing D and are doing a classical speed-weave. E, F, & G are facing H and are doing a speed-weave but rotating in the opposite direction (going backward when at the center position). I've not tried it yet, and to my knowledge, no one has.

If this is possible, I think you'll have to juggle slowly in order to make room for everybody on the figure 8.

   


More people in Torture Chambers

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Jugglers needed (base version): 8 good, 2 advanced

The principle is to connect several torture chambers. Two ways of doing that are explained here. If you don't know what is exactly a torture chamber, check the relevant page.

torture9 The first technique is to use one of the jugglers in a 4 counts ( C or D but here the pivot is [D_red=C_blue] who is actually only one person) as a link between two chambers in which he is participating simultaneously.
This principle can then be continued until one circle is closed ( 3 chambers may be enough with 12 very good jugglers).
torture10 The other technic is to align two chambers alongside each other. The passes are the same at every moment in the two chambers.
The two jugglers D_red and D_blue are not then in 4 counts anymore, but in 2 counts, making passes between them instead of selfs.
With this technique, you can align as many chambers as the number of jugglers allows since C can also be used as a link.